Last updated: September 16. 2013 11:21AM - 605 Views

Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

RALEIGH - The N.C. Pesticide Board recently approved the following settlement agreements for respondents in Catawba, Chatham, Davidson, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Henderson, Lincoln, Macon, Mecklenburg, Moore, Pitt, Sampson and Wake counties, as well as Pasadena, Texas.


— Jason M. Day, an employee of RiverCrest Golf Club in Hickory, agreed to pay $800 for applying restricted-use pesticides without being a licensed applicator.


— Esteban Gutierrez of Pittsboro agreed to pay $400 for applying pesticides without being a licensed applicator and for using Lesco Three-Way Selective Herbicide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.


— Fred K. Seebeck Jr. of Aberdeen agreed to pay $1,200 for selling restricted-use pesticides to an unlicensed applicator.


— Joseph L. Dupree Jr., an employee of Southern States Cooperative in Tarboro, agreed to pay $800 for receiving 2005.6 gallons of Roundup PowerMAX without a containment pad in the dispensing area.


— Steven Cody Coombs of Clinton agreed to pay $800 for applying Telone C-17 within 100 feet of a well and for using pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles caused an adverse effect.


— William Winbourne of Sumter, S.C., farm manager for Justice Family Farms in Elizabeth City, agreed to pay $950 for the improper disposal of pesticide containers by incineration and for using pesticide products in a manner inconsistent with their labeling.


— Robert J. Redd of Lexington agreed to pay $600 for applying pesticides without a pesticide applicator license.


— Kevin M. Herrmann, manager of Fairway Green Lawn Care in Raleigh, agreed to pay $1,000 for damage to rose bushes at a property where he treated the lawn with Cool Power Selective Herbicide and Riverdale 2, 4-D LV Ester. Samples of the rose bushes showed that the damage occurred from drift and that the products were used in a manner inconsistent with their labeling.


— Edward B. Denny, an employee of TriEst Ag Group Inc. in Greenville, agreed to pay $1,300 for using pesticides in a manner inconsistent with their labeling by failing to post adequate warning signs in fields after soil fumigation applications were made.


— Michael J. Cale, an employee of TriEst Ag Group Inc. in Greenville, agreed to pay $1,300 for using pesticides in a manner inconsistent with their labeling by failing to provide the site-specific Fumigation Management Plan required when using Tri-Boom 67 and by failing to post adequate warning signs in fields that were treated.


— Conrad Miller, manager of Courtney Retreat Center in Hendersonville, agreed to pay $600 for using Crossbow herbicide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling by allowing drift to damage trees and vegetation on a property adjacent to the area he treated.


— Claude D. Morgan IV agreed to pay $1,200 for improperly disposing of pesticides by dumping unused pesticides and for using pesticides in a manner inconsistent with product labeling.


— WEPAK Corp. of Charlotte agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated Wepak Lemon Disinfectant. The pesticide was found to be adulterated because it was contaminated with gram-positive bacilli.


— Chem-Tec Inc. of Winston-Salem agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated Chem-Tec Germicidal Spray & Wipe Cleaner. The pesticide was found to be misbranded because it was ineffective against S. aureus.


— C.J. Martin Co. of Pasadena, Texas, agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated Martin’s Rescue One Spray Protection. The pesticide was found to be adulterated because one batch was deficient in captan and another batch was deficient in malathion.


— Harry J. Gibson, an employee of Public Works for the Town of Franklin, agreed to pay $800 for applying pesticides without a pesticide applicator license.

Comments
comments powered by Disqus


Featured Businesses


Poll



Mortgage Minute