Last updated: March 14. 2014 9:16AM - 568 Views

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In a day and age where we can insert microchips into our pets to track them anywhere; where we can type a few characters on a computer and zoom in from outer space to any address we want; where we can get precise directions on a 3-inch by 5-inch gizmo in our vehicle every step of the way to any destination; and where we can turn on and off our alarm, television, lights and almost anything else in our home from anywhere in the world through our telephone, it seems incredible that we can lose track of an entire jumbo airliner carrying 239 people.


But that is exactly what seems to have happened to Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 more than 10 days ago.


Numerous theories, of course, have been tested and rationalized each and every day since Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 went missing on March 8. But every one of those theories — whether from intelligence professionals or water-cooler theorists — has the same final question in common: How is that possible?


Every single day since its disappearance, a report has been cast forward that initially gives hope of its discovery — only to be dashed later in the day. Though it all, highly skilled intelligence agencies in the United States, China, Great Britain and elsewhere have spent countless man-hours using a dizzying array of satellites, ships and planes with an incredible network of technology and concentrated on nothing else but finding the missing aircraft.


Nothing.


No wreckage. No radar blip. No bodies. No word.


Something like this seems completely unfathomable, given how the world has been shrunk by the increased connectivity that technology now offers us.


Like so many Bermuda Triangle mysteries before it, we may never know the plight of Flight 370. And if, in fact, that is the case, then we will forever be asking anyone who will listen, “How is that possible?”

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