Quarter-million dollars coming to Bladen County

By: Alan Wooten - Bladen Journal

More than a quarter-million dollars has been designated for Bladen County through State Street Aid to Municipalities, also known as the Powell Bill fund.

The N.C. Department of Transportation released the figures this week. Bladen County communities of Bladenboro, Clarkton, Dublin, East Arcadia, Elizabethtown, Tar Heel and White Lake will get a collective $252,681.60.

Half of that is distributed in October, with the remainder by Dec. 31.

North Carolina’s gas tax and other highway user fees generate the fund, named for former state senator and Whiteville Mayor Junius K. Powell. He was primary sponsor of the 1951 bill created to help the state’s cities with urban road problems.

Amounts are figured based on a formula set by the N.C. General Assembly. Population accounts for 75 percent, and 25 percent is based on the number of locally-maintained street miles.

Some municipalities may also get money from the Highway Trust Fund.

The state awarded more than $147.4 million to 508 municipalities.

• Bladenboro is being allocated $55,911.83, all from the Powell Bill. Its October allocation is $27,955.92.

• Clarkton is being allocated $33,244.46, all from the Powell Bill. Its October allocation is $16,622.23.

• Dublin is being allocated $11,875.07, all from the Powell Bill. Its October allocation is $5,937.54.

• East Arcadia is being allocated $12,716.05, all from the Powell Bill. Its October allocation is $6,358.03.

• Elizabethtown is being allocated $108,744.25, all from the Powell Bill. Its October allocation is $54,372.13.

• Tar Heel is being allocated $6,066.42, all from the Powell Bill. Its October allocation is $3,033.21.

• White Lake is being allocated $24,123.52, all from the Powell Bill. Its October allocation is $12,061.76.

In a news release, Transportation Secretary Jim Trogdon said, “The Powell Bill provides assistance for communities to maintain and improve the safety and condition of their transportation systems. That in turn improves the quality of life for their residents as they travel for jobs, school and healthcare.”

Alan Wooten

Bladen Journal